Archive for the ‘ Honey Technical Information ’ Category

The shocking fact about honey’s shelf life
Friday, October 7th, 2016


Product developers commonly ask, “What is the shelf life of honey?” Most find themselves in shock to find out there isn’t one.

That is right, if kept under the right conditions honey will not spoil.

Archeologists have discovered preserved honey while digging in Egypt, and to their surprise, the honey was still edible. Although we do not suggest leaving it on the shelf for that long, it does prove that honey has the capability to outlast our own lives.

Honey’s moisture content (about 17%), low pH and antibacterial properties make it one of the only ingredients that will most likely not spoil. It is, however, still important to store honey properly to maintain its integrity.

Honey should be kept in a sealed container at room temperature, between 64-75°F and out of direct sunlight. If honey is kept in cooler temperatures, between 35-60°F, it is known to hasten honey’s natural crystallization process. But that is not an end for honey.

If honey crystalizes, it can be saved by heating. Honey can be placed in hot water and slightly shaken to reduce or remove crystallization. Different varietals of honey may take longer than others to crystalize, and some actually have a low tendency to crystalize at all. Either way, it can be saved!

The next time you purchase honey, there is no need to fear. With proper care, your honey is here to stay.

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Why are there so many varieties of honey?
Sunday, April 17th, 2016

Varities of Honey

In the United States alone, there are more than 300 varieties of honey. Clover, buckwheat, tupelo and basswood are among the most popular flavors, but there are countless more to choose from.

Why is there such a wide variety of flavors? The answer isn’t as simple as you think. The flavor of honey comes from where the bees gather nectar. Different flowers produce different nectar, resulting in honey with different tastes, aromas and experiences.

All honey starts off as nectar, which is gathered by honeybees and stored in a special stomach. After filling their stomach, bees return to the hive and exchange the nectar with hundreds of other bees, breaking down the nectar into fructose and glucose. From there, the bees deposit it into a comb, fan it until there is only about 17% moisture left, and seal it away with a wax cap for storage.

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National Popcorn Day is Sweet
Monday, January 19th, 2015

Popcorn is one of the nation’s most loved snacks, which is why we celebrate National Popcorn Day today!

Air-popped popcorn is naturally high in dietary fiber and antioxidants and low in calories. Add some delicious sweet, salty or savory toppings and you have a delicious snack that is indulgent and whole grain.

To celebrate National Popcorn Day, here are a few of our favorite Made with Honey favorites.

Smartfood’s Honey Cinnamon Pecan Granola Coated Popcorn is a crunchy, all-natural snack made with honey, cinnamon and brown sugar. The popcorn is coated with rolled oats and roasted pecans.

Lakota Honey Popcorn is a combination of sweet honey and traditional salt. The light and airy snack comes from a line of the first and only Native American owned and operated organization producing, processing, packaging and marketing popcorn celebrating its Native American heritage.

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